In its current issue, Australian Ageing Agenda features an article by Dr Malcolm Fisk that focuses on the modernisation of social alarms and telecare. His attention is first given to the issue of cybersecurity (important in anyone’s book). But the key message is not so much about how social alarms and telecare technologies are ‘out of date’ and vulnerable to cyber attacks; rather it is about our opportunity to develop new service frameworks, based on digital networks, that enable people to access health and support services in new ways.

Central to the new service frameworks is the way that people can be empowered through access wider opportunities for education and work, entertainment, social networking and public engagement. Linked with this is the extent to which we can all increase our health knowledge and play a greater part in the management of our health.

But as we approach necessary (and inevitable) changes in service frameworks, Malcolm argues (for the UK and Australia) that there is a ‘conspiracy of whispers’ for fear of upsetting that minority of service providers, manufacturers and suppliers that do not see the opportunity.

Key messages focus on the need for the further improvement of our broadband networks – and, of course, to be cyber-aware as we harness the linked potential. For inspiration, he suggests, we should look to Scotland … to which we should add the Scandinavian countries who are several steps further ahead. More than this, he notes, the new service frameworks are supported through the Telehealth Quality Group’s 2018/19 International Code of Practice for Telehealth Services.

The full article is accessible here